Mark #44

Jun/Jul 2013

The past 15 years have seen architecture in Indonesia free itself from the stifling uniformity that defined it during the presidential regimes of Sukarno and Suharto. Large government-controlled architecture firms have made place for small, independent practices that are giving the country a new sense of self-confidence. This issue, Mark focuses on 14 of the nation’s newest projects. Then it’s off to China, where OMA’s stock exchange in Shenzhen has just been completed.

Cross Section:

Kavakav, JKMM, Salhaus, WMR, Alex McDowell, Wim Goes, DX, GLUCK+, Kem Roomhaus, Lanz+Mutschlechner/Wolfgang Meraner, Claus en Kaan, Hondelatte Laporte, TNA, Herzog & de Meuron, Elasticospa

Perspective:

  • Introduction: 15 Years of Progress.
  • Andra Matin: Andra Matin is the nestor of contemporary Indonesian architecture.
  • Mamo Studio: Adi Purnomo wants to incorporate construction workers’ expertise into architectural design.

Long Section:

  • OMA in Shenzhen: OMA’s Shenzhen Stock Exchange is too simple to be copyrighted yet too distinctive to be imitated.
  • Bryan Boyer in New York: Bryan Boyer evaluates Brickstarter and discusses the future of crowdfunding for architects.
  • Ashton Raggatt McDougall in Melbourne / Perth: Three new buildings by ARM fit into the firm’s portfolio like the pieces of a puzzle.
  • Micro-Apartments: Smaller than the bedsit or studio flat, the micro-apartment offers a solution for urban housing.
  • DC Alliance in Ningbo: The design of a 1000-unit housing project in Ningbo, China, is aimed specifically at young professionals.
  • Low Architects in Antwerp: Stijn Cockx and Tom Hindryckx combine everyday materials with extravagant details.
  • Tense Architecture Network in Sykamino: A house by Tilemachos Andrianopoulos and Kostas Mavros reflects the forces of nature.
  • Iwan Baan in Amsterdam: Iwan Baan casts a light on his photography, with its focus on buildings across the globe.
  • Buchner Bründler Architekten in Switzerland: Buchner Bründler Architekten recently finished three new houses in Switzerland. We asked the firm’s clients to share their thoughts on processes and results.
  • Franz König in Cologne: After giving architecture a try at the AA in London, Franz König returned to Germany and the family enterprise: publishing and selling books on art, architecture and design.