— Frame Magazine —

Molly Goddard invites gallery-goers to meddle with her designs

LONDON – The NOW Gallery on Greenwich Peninsula currently hosts the work of former Central Saint Martins graduate Molly Goddard, transforming the space into a neon tulle haze. Her fascination with hand-crafted techniques such as pleating, smocking and crocheting transcended her studies to a signature aesthetic grounded in a form of acid froufrou and frill. The What I Like exhibition seeks to bring new audiences to the gallery by merging the worlds of art and fashion.



Visitors are met by a selection of 9-m-long brightly coloured tulle dresses suspended from the ceiling. For the installation, Goddard reimagines her trademark voluminous and ethereal garments by experimenting with the amount of fabric that can be manipulated into one piece. As a designer she is not only known for her distinctive style and craft but for interactive and engaging presentations of her collections. Some of the most well-known incidences involved models partaking in a life-drawing class or even buttering sandwiches in a makeshift factory production line. This exhibition takes the idea one step further and invites the viewer to interact with the dresses themselves. Sewing guides are dotted around the space, encouraging guests to hand embroider shapes and patterns of their own onto the garment.



The concept strives to build an environment in which the skill of handcraft can be admired, yet is made accessible to anyone who dares to experiment and make mistakes. ‘I am so excited to be able to really celebrate craft technique in such an extreme visual way,’ says Goddard. ‘Making oversize, non-precious interactive pieces is key to what I love and what the brand aims to represent. I can’t wait to see the stories that will be told through embroidery and to witness what skills people have or manage to discover when visiting the exhibition.’



Photos Charles Emerson 

nowgallery.co.uk/exhibitions/whatilike

The What I Like exhibition continues at the NOW Gallery on Greenwich Peninsula in London until 19 February 2017.