Top 10 Japanese Houses

Our Top Picks

It's quirky, modern and often unexpected; Japanese residential design gets us really excited. Here are some of our favourites from recent months.

1. Complex House by Tomohiro Hata Architect and Associates
Nagoya, Japan
The design of a family dwelling in Nagoya, Japan, was based on fitting as many rooms as possible into the 100-sq-m space.

2. On The Corner by Eastern Design Office
Shiga, Japan
Geometrical forms are the crux of an apartment building in Shiga, where the triangular structure is comprised of solely square shapes.

3. Shinagawa House by Be Fun Design
Tokyo, Japan
In a 36-sq-m plot at the edge of Shinagawa, Tokyo, a two-storey dwelling embodies the jaunty spirit of its residents: a young couple who are trekkers and climbers.

4. Hansha Reflection House by Studio SKLIM
Nagoya, Japan
In Nagoya, Japan, a two-storey detached home combines the ‘ephemeral moments of its surroundings with structural ingenuity.’

5. H-House by TOFU architects
Shiga, Japan
A three-storey structure in Shiga contains a private duplex home and public café, connected by one grand staircase.

6. White Dormitory House by CASE-REAL for Il Vento
Teshima, Japan
The renovation of a private home in Teshima has turned an outdated single-story dwelling into monochromatic dormitory-style housing.

7. Cross House in Koganei by Yukio Asari | Love Architecture Inc.
Tokyo, Japan
In Koganei, a residential suburb of Tokyo, a residential property resembles a tree house, tucked amongst cherry trees and greenery.

8. VISTA House by Apollo Architects & Associates
Tokyo, Japan
In Tokyo’s Nishidai Itabashi neighbourhood, Japanese firm Apollo Architects & Associates have amazingly fit a three-storey residence in a 54-sq-m plot.

9. Lik House by Satoru Hirota Architects
Tokyo, Japan
Japanese firm Satoru Hirota Architects sets a single family house in three tunnel-like volumes.

10. House M by AE5 Partners
Kaga, Japan
In the lush green mountainsides of Kaga, a private home is blending with its surroundings.

Comments

Freddie

I wonder how energy-efficient these designs are. Not a single mention of features such as insulation, double-glazing, thermal mass, solar panels etc.

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