Top Trend of 2018: Click and mortar

Amsterdam – This year, Frame readers voted with their clicks to highglight one of the year's top trends: the intentional intersection between the phone and the retail space.

From in-app-in-store shopping to big-data physical translations, here are the best  click-and-mortar-brick-and-mobile case studies of the year from Frameweb, Frame and the Frame Awards.

Photos courtesy of H&M

[1] H&M’S FLAGSHIP STORE IN PARIS

‘H&M’s flagship store has reopened with some surprising changes to the traditional format. Retailers are having to work harder than ever to bring consumers into their stores. The anonymity of online shopping is pushing the giants of fast fashion to focus on what their spatial design can give the customer while incorporating the efficiency of e-commerce.’

[Read the story here]

 

Photos courtesy of Ssense

[2] SSENSE MONTREAL FLAGSHIP

‘CEO Rami Atallah realized that while e-commerce enables scale, it has its shortcomings – namely fostering human connection. Talia Dorsey, director of retail strategy for Ssense, explains how the David Chipperfield-designed flagship incorporates over a decade’s worth of analytics, testing and iteration collected from the brand’s website, as well as its previous store.’

[Read the story here]

 

Photos by Ophélie Maurus

[3] SHINZO PARIS

‘The Outdoor is the first space the consumer enters, as it is an extension of the street into the shop. It plays with hijacked pieces of urban furniture that become displays. This area hosts a buy-and-collect piece of furniture, as consumers are able to order online and pick up their orders in-store.’

[Read the story here]

 

Photos by Sean Fennessy

[4] DOT COMME COLLECTION IN MELBOURNE

‘Here, the space displays a curated selection of hero pieces, while over 3,000 garments are stored meticulously behind an obscured door. The entire archive is available to view on Dot Comme’s online store – which visitors are welcome to scroll through, while sitting on Gaetano Pesce and Memphis Milano furniture. After selecting the items they would like to see, a door carved into the white, bulging walls allows employees to retrieve them.’

[Read the story here]

 

Photos courtesy of Nike

[5] NIKE’S HOUSE OF INNOVATION 000 IN NYC

‘We’re learning from data points what consumers are interested in, what they’re Instagramming, what they’re querying on our websites, what sneakers they’re picking out on our app. We use this information to modify the store as people come in. Ultimately, it’s this killer app that allows us to adapt to the pace of consumption today.’

[Read the story here]

Find out what trends emerged from the most popular retail, hospitality and workspace interiors of 2018 in our Reader's Choice section.

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