Tactile Textiles & Traditional Techniques

Colourful patterns and screen-printed printed textiles in the spirit of ‘timeless design’ (by Alisa Benfey).

The forthcoming book Masterclass: Fashion & Textiles is the next title in our series that showcases master’s degree courses from some of the world’s leading graduate schools. As the book's title suggests, both fashion and textile courses are featured. Here we share some graduate textile projects that caught our eye.

Modern technology is combined with traditional craft techniques to create vibrant fabrics and tactile textiles. The graduates and alumni whose work is featured here include:

Alisa Benfey (Tama Art University, Tokyo)
This project included the creation of colourful patterns and screen-printed printed textiles in the spirit of ‘timeless design’. During her graduate studies, Benfey liked to work by hand as she considered it is still the most important practice for design.

Chase Taylor (Rhode Island School of Design, Providence)
An intricate textile fabric created with jacquard woven mohair, metallic, rayon and cotton that was hand embroidered. During her graduate work, Taylor developed a different outlook on making and creating, as well as new and innovative ways to learn while doing. (Photo Ji Weo)

Ekta Khokhar Kaul (Heriot-Watt University, Galashiels)
An investigation into how traditional textile processes done by hand could be combined with modern technology in new ways to develop textiles. In her graduation project, Kaul explored traditional craft techniques and developed a range of textiles with distressed textures and graphic patterns.

Cristina Casasayas and Yuna Kono (ELISAVA, Barcelona)
Kataezome, the traditional Japanese technique of stamping, and furoshiki, Japanese wrapping techniques, underpinned this project’s theme.

Maiko Tanaka (The Swedish School of Textiles, Borås)
The creation of aesthetic expressions through hand weaving was explored in this work with the aim being to evoke certain feelings by focusing on the tactility of the textile. (Photo Jan Berg)

Miki Kihara (Tama Art University, Tokyo)
An intricate tapestry that depicts the act of crying – the greatest 'useless' function of the human body and one with an unfathomable mystery to it. In this project, various things contained in the tears suggested the repressed ideas often behind the act of crying.

The three new titles in the Masterclass series will be published in a matter of weeks! Fashion projects from this publication have already been shared here, and work from the architecture book can be found here and from the graphic design title here. The first book in the series, Masterclass: Product Design, is available here.

Images courtesy of their respective graduate schools.

Leaderboard: Architonic
Leaderboard: Architonic

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